Te Mauri - Pimatisiwin

Resilience, an Evolving Concept: A Review of Literature Relevant to Aboriginal Research


 

Resilience, an Evolving Concept: A Review of Literature Relevant to Aboriginal Research

John Fleming Robert J. Ledogar*

Abstract

Resilience has been most frequently defined as positive adaptation despite adversity. Over the past 40 years, resilience research has gone through several stages. From an initial focus on the invulnerable or invincible child, psychologists began to recognize that much of what seems to promote resilience originates outside of the individual. This led to a search for resilience factors at the individual, family, community — and, most recently, cultural — levels. In addition to the effects that community and culture have on resilience in individuals, there is growing interest in resilience as a feature of entire communities and cultural groups. Contemporary researchers have found that resilience factors vary in different risk contexts and this has contributed to the notion that resilience is a process. In order to characterize the resilience process in a particular context, it is necessary to identify and measure the risk involved and, in this regard, perceived discrimination and historical trauma are part of the context in many Aboriginal communities. Researchers also seek to understand how particular protective factors interact with risk factors and with other protective factors to support relative resistance. For this purpose they have developed resilience models of three main types: “compensatory,” “protective,” and “challenge” mod

* Acknowledgments. The authors wish to thank Dr. Neil Andersson for his valuable comments on drafts of this article. We are also grateful for the comments of the anonymous persons who reviewed the article prior to publication.

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