Te Mauri - Pimatisiwin

Supporting the bereavement needs of Pacific communities in Aotearoa New Zealand following a suicide

Jemaima Tiatia-Seath, Roy Lay-Yee, Martin von Randow

Abstract

On average, at least 60 people are directly impacted by a suicide death (i.e. family, friends, colleagues, school peers). As a result, in most cases, there is a lack of support for the suicide bereaved, mental health issues are intensified, there is increased suicide risk, a strain upon family relationships, there are poor coping skills, and for some, financial difficulties. What is also less known is the culturally relevant support needs of Pacific individuals, families and communities bereaved by suicide in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 An 18-month mixed methods project was designed to include an online survey, focus groups and fono (a commonly used term by some Pacific groups to refer to a ‘meeting’). This was undertaken among Pacific communities as well as service providers who worked with Pacific peoples bereaved by suicide. The results of the Pacific community survey are presented.

The Pacific community survey drew a total of 173 unique responses, 153 conducted online and 20 via hard copy. This study is the first of its kind, both in Aotearoa, New Zealand and abroad, that specifically addresses the suicide postvention needs of Pacific communities. 

(click on PDF to read more)

Previous

Us women, our ways, our world

Next

Towards mauri ora: Examining the potential relationship between indigenous-centric entrepreneurship education and Māori suicide prevention in Aotearoa, New Zealand

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén