JIW, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2017

JIW, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2017

E te whānau,
It is my pleasure to provide a brief of our first Issue for 2017 where innovative indigenous leadership commentaries are embraced. Two book reviews add to this effort; one articulating the changing roles in leadership and the other the incorporation of traditional indigenous health approaches in collaboration with psychiatry contributing to wellbeing.
Research development in community-engaged scholarship is advocated in this issue by the encouragement of combining unique cultural traditions and discipline-specific scholarship to provide more meaningful examination and results for indigenous people.
Understanding the term self-determination in the context of health then drawing conclusions about collaborative efforts between government and indigenous communities to support community-controlled health care is explored. Holistic health; the impacts of colonisation and understandings of self still remains an important contribution. Also discussed is the contribution that youth are making for Indigenous justice on behalf of their families, communities, future generations, to preserve Mother Earth, the natural environment.
Ensuring youth mental wellbeing is stated as linked to the encouragement and maintenance of social and cultural connections during the formative years. In addition, wellness workshops using arts-based methods such as theatre, video, and photography, with a group of indigenous youth, themed on healing, life, ceremony, relationships, and hope, encourages the same.
Indigenous women leaders are profiled as strong and resilient to change and challenges with the commentary claiming that central to the success of these leaders is staying connected to whānau (family) and friends, and being positively influenced by tamariki (children), tauira (students) and employees.
I am certain the readership will benefit from the accounts within Volume 2, Issue 1 where indigenous wellbeing can be progressed by their application.
Dr Kahu McClintock
Managing Editor

Matariki – Celebrations of the past and future

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Weaving past, present, and future

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Indigenous leadership and wellbeing

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Māori women’s perspectives of leadership and wellbeing

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Suicide prevention education: Indigenous youths’ perspectives on wellness

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Branching out: Insights about researcher development from participatory action and indigenous approaches to research

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Towards healthier Indigenous health policies? Navigating the labyrinth for answers

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The spirit of Indigenous youth: The resilience and self-determination in connecting to the spirit and ways of knowing

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First Nations Elders in Northwestern Ontario’s perspectives of health, body image and eating disorders

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Defining positive mental wellbeing for New Zealand-born Cook Islands youth

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Collaborative and indigenous mental health therapy: Tataihono – stories of Māori health and psychiatry

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The changing role of the leader in Māori society

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